1. Technology

Delphi May Be the Only Choice You Have

Is Delphi the Only Choice?

By

Article submitted by Nick Hodges

As frustrating as it is to us Delphi lovers, Delphi has always been a tough sell in corporate America -- not because Delphi isn't perfectly capable of peforming any task that a corporate development team might throw at it, but mainly because many managers and decision makers aren't willing to take the perceived risk of investing in a non-Microsoft development solution. Borland has (rightly perhaps for a while in the past, but certainly not for a few years now) the reputation as being a bit on the edge financially, and so the safe, "nobody ever got fired..." decision has been to buy Microsoft. This will probably continue to be the case for some time, as Microsoft certainly will continue to be the a dominant company in the marketplace for the foreseeable future. However, I think the advent of the .Net Framework as the "platform of the future" and Microsoft's particular strategy for moving people to .Net both provide Borland and Delphi developers with a unique opportunity that actually makes Delphi the only safe development platform for a large number of projects that will be developed over the next few years.

Microsoft clearly wants us all to move to .Net, and frankly, I think we all should be happy to make that move. The .Net platform is really cool and really powerful. It provides a very capable and easily accessed framework (the Framework Class Library, or FCL) that is lightyears ahead of the Win32 API. Microsoft actually seems to have finally figured out object-oriented programming. Once the actual framework becomes ubiquitious, or even the basis for the operating system itself , building, managing, and deploying applications will be much easier than it is now. I, for one, am eagerly looking forward to Delphi 8 for the .Net Framework and being able to develop applications with it.

Microsoft clearly wants you to move to the platform as well. They make it totally easy to download and install; every new operating system includes it, and they are on an all-out marketing campaign to raise awareness in the developer community in order to promote its use among software developers. The most interesting thing about all of their actions, though, is that they clearly want to force people to make the jump to .Net by pretty much cutting off existing development paths and by not providing a clear migration path for existing applicaitons. It appears that the idea is to instill a bit of panic in their community of developers -- "Holy cow, we'd better get on this .Net bandwagon, or we are going to be left behind!"

Sadly, that is pretty much the case -- VB and C++ developers who don't migrate to .Net soon will be (are?) pretty much abandoned. Sure, there's "Managed C++", but what serious C++ developer would really want to use this neutered version of the language? VB6 developers are abandoned in the sense that VB.NET is so different from what they have done that it is pretty much a whole new language. Code written for VB6 simply won't compile in .Net. And of course, there were no existing C# projects before .Net was released. Therefore, if you are a Microsoft development shop, and you want to move to .Net, then you are pretty much talking about a complete rewrite of all of your Win32 code no matter what you were using to develop those applications. There simply is no easy migration path to .Net for your existing applications.

And that, of course, begs the question -- "What to do for a new application that needs to run on Win32 today..."

©2014 About.com. All rights reserved.